loader image

Ruben Escobedo

Ruben grew up in Wenatchee, Washington, the “apple capital of the world.” It was a community where families left their doors unlocked at night, he says, and where family members were his day care providers while his parents worked. (Like the relatives who cared for him, young Ruben spoke only Spanish. He’s still bilingual.) Now he works to create strong communities for others. “I’m just putting myself in there,” he says, “turning ideas into reality and contributing to healthier communities.”
Account Executive
Community connector
Asks the experts
Lifts heavy things

Ruben’s take on:

Making connections.

As a new college graduate. Ruben didn’t know where he’d work — but “I knew I liked connecting with people,” he says.

Now that’s his job. As an account executive, he works with diverse clients from communities throughout Washington, helping them connect with partners while keeping collaborative projects moving forward. One good way to do that: ensuring that everyone he works with has the tools they need to succeed.

Ruben Says:

My job is, ‘OK, we’re here this week, we need to be here next week,’ and making that happen.

Honoring audiences’ experiences.

One insight gained early in Ruben’s work to support DH clients’ vaccine hesitancy efforts: Each community is different, and each is fighting against its own systemic barriers and, sometimes, histories of trauma. To know what a community wants and needs to change its behaviors, he says, ask them. Start with one-on-one conversations with leaders from each community you’re serving.

Some groups trust vaccination information from leaders in their own communities over messages from a big organization. Others look to their friends and family for advice. For others, community is key — they’d happily get a shot at a local event. “It’s understanding how they live and what’s important to them,” Ruben says.

Lifting weights.

Ruben started lifting weights soon after high school. He found the challenge he was looking for and fell in love with the process of building a better version of himself, physically and mentally. He also has learned that constant failure is a part of it of that process.

“Weight training is a never-ending story,” Ruben says. “You’re never going to achieve the results you want. But every time you go to the gym, you can progress.”

Education

Bachelor’s degree, business administration,
Gonzaga University

 

Pin It on Pinterest