loader image

Ian Hanson

Ian’s work as a DH account executive reflects his passion for thoughtful strategy and clear communication, as well as his passion for equity in public institutions. He oversees a wide range of public affairs projects, particularly in the realms of advocacy and crisis management, and he also works on the business development side of the agency, managing e-blasts, software and marketing.
Account executive
Master messager
Believer in government
History buff

The politics of communication.

Ian’s fascination with the inner-workings of politics and public policy started around the time he was first eligible to vote, when he volunteered to canvas for a state senate campaign as a teenager. He went on to intern for Congresswoman Suzan DelBene and work for the Seattle Department of Transportation’s Equity Program.

Those interests influence his work at DH, which he describes as existing at the nexus where business and government meet.

“I’m most interested in trying to drive change, and that’s why I really enjoy the public affairs side of the communications world,” Ian says. “The force of public institutions and their impact on the private world is huge. They have such an influence on our communities and our economy.”

IAN says:

I prefer an intentional and measured approach to communications, as opposed to throwing everything at the wall and seeing what sticks. But you should still cast a wide net when it comes to your audiences and who you want to work with, and you shouldn’t be above anything or anyone.

Just the facts.

Ian has also had a lifelong obsession with history, and he’s especially adept at facts surrounding world wars and presidential elections. Want to know which candidates ran against Abraham Lincoln in 1860, or against Teddy Roosevelt in 1912? Ian’s got you covered. He’s also been known to correct errors on a Wikipedia page or two.

Originally from Minnesota, Ian spent most of his upbringing in Ferndale, Wash., and has fully embraced his parents’ affinity for the Green Bay Packers.

Education

BA, Political Economy and Sociology, University of Washington

Pin It on Pinterest